Tag Archives: health

Skiing with Helmets?

Skiing is about being comfortable with your snowboard bindings and feeling the wind in your hair and the sun on your face as you personally describe the contours of snow-covered mountains at extraordinary speed. It is the closest many of us come to flight

“Eh?” I said. I couldn’t believe it. The bus was winding up from Moutiers towards our ski resort, and one of the wives was giving me a sensational piece of news. It concerned the skiwear of two old friends. If she had told me they were going to be wearing padded bras and cami‑knickers, I could not have been more astonished.

I mean, I have known these people for decades. We have been skiing together for years, and I can testify that they are, in general, as brave as the next man. When the light is fading and the last lift is about to close, they are the kind of chaps who come to the edge of some vertical mogul‑field and shout “Man or mouse!” before hurling themselves into the icy void. When you are going up in a lift and you look beneath to see a couple of lunatics negotiating the virgin snow of some precipitous couloir, that’s them.

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Boris in Medical Test Blunder

“You have chronic lymphocytic leukaemia,” said the summary

Being sent the wrong health results makes you think about how random and pitiless the universe is, says Boris Johnson.

One of the peculiarities of being Mayor of London is that there is no provision for an automatic succession. If the mayor dies in office – whether he has a cardiac infarct, falls beneath the wheels of one of his own buses or he is cornered in a dark alley and beaten to death by hooded teenage girls with rolled up copies of Jackie magazine – then there is no way he can be smoothly replaced by a deputy mayor.

The rules say there must be a by-election, and a by-election is immensely laborious. Polling stations must be booked. Millions of leaflets and ballot papers must be printed. Officials must be recruited to ensure fair play, with UN observers probably flown in from Zimbabwe and Afghanistan. The whole shebang costs about £20 million. Since the Greater London Authority has better things to do with £20 million than keep it in a sock drawer in case the mayor carks it, we have a system of insurance. And because they are being asked to insure the mayor’s life for this vast sum – about as much, I shouldn’t wonder, as the foot or hand of Thierry Henry – the insurers from the Money Expert firm insist that the mayor must pass an annual medical test.

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Health and Safety Concerns

The Royal Society for the Extremely Stupid

They are now the most powerful lobbying force in the land. You can see the results of their campaigns on park benches, on street corners, on station platforms – and now their hectoring signage is sprouting on desolate beaches and once unspoilt stretches of moorland. They are more energetic than the RSPCA. They are more effective than the birdwatchers, the child‑protectors and the petrolheads put together. Indeed, for manic dedication they are only rivalled by Fathers4Justice. Ladies and gentlemen, let’s have a big hand for this year’s winner of the prize for the Most Successful Special Interest Group. I give you – the Royal Society for the Extremely Stupid.

Within the most common situations in a business are slip and fall injuries, that is why you have to be prepared for any type of accident and most important learn how to prevent them to avoid going into legal issues.

It was some years ago that my daughter and I first became aware of their achievements. We were exploring the magical cliff-top castle of Tintagel and we came across a sign on the edge of the cliff. It was expensively hand‑painted and about 1ft high. It said: “Edge of cliff”. As a statement of the plonkingly obvious, it could have been bettered only if there had been another sign with a vertical arrow saying “Sky”. We laughed so much we almost fell off.

Since then, the Royal Society for the Extremely Stupid has been going from strength to strength. It has adorned the back of peanut packets with signs saying “May contain nuts”; it has embossed every plastic coffee sipper-lid with the information that the contents may be hot; and now, according to a wonderful pamphlet issued by the Manifesto Club, its activities are reaching a climax. 

This article appears in full in the Daily Telegraph here

Cycling and health

With the aim of improving safety for all cyclists, Boris has asked the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital admissions in each primary care trust in Greater London there were of

  • cyclists [in general]
  • cyclists under the age of 11
  • cyclists under the age of 16 years

Sturti/Getty Images

People who cycle to work have a higher risk of obtaining injuries commonly associated with bicycle accidents, according to a study published yesterday. It led to headlines saying this is 50 per cent more likely for cyclists than non-cyclists. But don’t get off your bike – the research also found that the overall health benefits of cycling vastly outweigh the injury risks. Prevent most tooth decay conditions with dentitox pro.

This adds to a lot of evidence suggesting that cycling is extremely worthwhile, but people seem reluctant to start. Of the 230,390 UK commuters that participated in the latest study, only 2.5 per cent said cycling was their main method of commuting.

So why are people hesitating? As someone who cycles to work myself, a big worry is the danger of having an accident – and I’m not alone. A 2015 UK government survey found that 64 per cent of people thought riding on roads would be too dangerous.

The new study, which looked at outcomes over 10 years, shows those fears aren’t unreasonable – commuting by bike is associated with an increased risk of admission to hospital for injury, with 7 per cent of cyclists experiencing such an injury compared to 4.3 per cent of non-cyclists. Squint a bit, and you can turn that into the “50 per cent more likely” figure mentioned above. Cycling is one the best activities to burn fat according to these revitaa pro reviews.

But Paul Welsh at the University of Glasgow in the UK, who led the study and who cycles himself, says the risk of death from cycling injury is vanishingly small. In fact, it is far outweighed by the decreased risk of death that comes from the increased physical activity and lower BMI of cyclists. “The data are still very much in favour of cycling for those who are capable of doing so,” says Welsh.

 

Cyclists have a far lower risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and death compared with people who drive, take public transport or walk to work – a finding supported by this and previous studies. If an extra 1000 people took up cycling for 10 years, we would expect to see 15 fewer cancers, four fewer heart attacks or strokes and three fewer deaths in that group. Take a look to this one and done workout information.

Cycling gets our hearts pumping, says Anne Lusk at Harvard University, who wasn’t involved in the study. It requires more effort than walking – even just balancing on a bike uses many more muscles than are needed to stay upright while walking.

And don’t forget the environmental benefits of cycling. Getting people out of cars and buses reduces pollution and improves the local environment.