Supporting the village shop – update

CheckendonPOThis afternoon, Boris stopped in Checkendon, in his Henley constituency, to inaugurate the combined village shop and Post Office which was taken over by Bal Budesha in 2007. Despite the biting wind and the hour of the day, over 70 local people of all ages turned out for the occasion. After cutting the inaugural ribbon and viewing the wide range of local, organic and staple, everyday produce in the shop that, like so many others around the country, also fulfils functions as the surgery transport waiting room, newsagent, information centre and more besides.

CheckendonPostersSome of the children presented Boris with some excellent ‘Save our Post Office’ posters for his office and Boris selected Isobel Willis’s well-written defence of the shop as the one to read to the assembled crowd. Boris then gave a short speech recognising the vital role of post offices and shops in communities such as this.

Jane Barker of the Oxfordshire Rural Community Council presented Bal with its Best Independent Retailer award before Boris moved on to a meeting with various local officials.

February 07, 2007 Update

Much to the delight of all, the post office and shop has been reprieved.  Thank you, Boris, for your support.

Welcome to the revamped site!

Well, here it is – the new, shiny, official Boris Johnson website!

Hopefully you’ve managed to find your way around by now – if not, you can explore the archives, visit the photo gallery, read about Boris and contribute to the enormous community on the official Forum.

A web monkey (well, me) has been tinkering under the bonnet for the past week, putting the finishing touches to the various functions on the site. Let us know your thoughts, either in the Forum or using the Contact Form. Enjoy! I’m off to watch the final lick of paint dry…

Cycling and health

With the aim of improving safety for all cyclists, Boris has asked the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital admissions in each primary care trust in Greater London there were of

  • cyclists [in general]
  • cyclists under the age of 11
  • cyclists under the age of 16 years

Sturti/Getty Images

People who cycle to work in the UK have a higher risk of getting injured badly enough to be hospitalised, according to a study published yesterday. It led to headlines saying this is 50 per cent more likely for cyclists than non-cyclists. But don’t get off your bike – the research also found that the overall health benefits of cycling vastly outweigh the injury risks. Visit https://thehealthmania.com/proplant-complete-shake-by-gundry-md-is-the-perfect-breakfast-option-for-weight-watchers/6904/ to learn more about weight loss activities.

This adds to a lot of evidence suggesting that cycling is extremely worthwhile, but people seem reluctant to start. Of the 230,390 UK commuters that participated in the latest study, only 2.5 per cent said cycling was their main method of commuting.

So why are people hesitating? As someone who cycles to work myself, a big worry is the danger of having an accident – and I’m not alone. A 2015 UK government survey found that 64 per cent of people thought riding on roads would be too dangerous.

The new study, which looked at outcomes over 10 years, shows those fears aren’t unreasonable – commuting by bike is associated with an increased risk of admission to hospital for injury, with 7 per cent of cyclists experiencing such an injury compared to 4.3 per cent of non-cyclists. Squint a bit, and you can turn that into the “50 per cent more likely” figure mentioned above. Cycling is one the best activities to burn fat according to these okinawa flat belly tonic reviews.

But Paul Welsh at the University of Glasgow in the UK, who led the study and who cycles himself, says the risk of death from cycling injury is vanishingly small. In fact, it is far outweighed by the decreased risk of death that comes from the increased physical activity and lower BMI of cyclists. “The data are still very much in favour of cycling for those who are capable of doing so,” says Welsh.

 

Cyclists have a far lower risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and death compared with people who drive, take public transport or walk to work – a finding supported by this and previous studies. If an extra 1000 people took up cycling for 10 years, we would expect to see 15 fewer cancers, four fewer heart attacks or strokes and three fewer deaths in that group. Check out the latest meticore reviews from customers.

Cycling gets our hearts pumping, says Anne Lusk at Harvard University, who wasn’t involved in the study. It requires more effort than walking – even just balancing on a bike uses many more muscles than are needed to stay upright while walking.

And don’t forget the environmental benefits of cycling. Getting people out of cars and buses reduces pollution and improves the local environment.