Boris Johnson: Nigel Farage’s decision to blame M4 traffic on immigration is like ‘effluent’ and ‘sewage’

"Yeah, I heard this. Xenophobia is like sewage, it’s a natural concomitant of the human condition," Mr Johnson said.

"We’ve got to manage it, we’ve got to dispose of it. It’s like effluent, it’s something that human beings naturally produce."

Pushed on the comments by the show's host Nick Ferrari, Mr Johnson said that immigration had been "massively" beneficial for London and the country but xenophobia reflected a wider fear of Otherness.

"It’s part of the way human beings are. I think there’s a natural sort of tendency to be alarmed about the Other, the alien," he said.

"My view about the whole immigration is very, very clear. London has benefited massively from immigration; the country benefits massively from immigration, but people need to be British.

"They need to speak English, they need to be loyal to this culture, to this country, to our institutions, to our society, to the Queen, to the rule of law – all the things that make us British – a sense of humour, and not freaking out about traffic jams on the motorway."

Mr Farage said over the weekend he was unable to attend a reception for 100 party supporters to meet the leader at Ukip’s first conference in Wales because of traffic on the M4.

Speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics Wales, Mr Farage said: "It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here – it should have taken three-and-a-half to four.

"That is nothing to do with professionalism, what it does have to do with is a population that is going through the roof chiefly because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be."

Boris Johnson: Nigel Farage’s decision to blame M4 traffic on immigration is like ‘effluent’ and ‘sewage’

"Yeah, I heard this. Xenophobia is like sewage, it’s a natural concomitant of the human condition," Mr Johnson said.

"We’ve got to manage it, we’ve got to dispose of it. It’s like effluent, it’s something that human beings naturally produce."

Pushed on the comments by the show's host Nick Ferrari, Mr Johnson said that immigration had been "massively" beneficial for London and the country but xenophobia reflected a wider fear of Otherness.

"It’s part of the way human beings are. I think there’s a natural sort of tendency to be alarmed about the Other, the alien," he said.

"My view about the whole immigration is very, very clear. London has benefited massively from immigration; the country benefits massively from immigration, but people need to be British.

"They need to speak English, they need to be loyal to this culture, to this country, to our institutions, to our society, to the Queen, to the rule of law – all the things that make us British – a sense of humour, and not freaking out about traffic jams on the motorway."

Mr Farage said over the weekend he was unable to attend a reception for 100 party supporters to meet the leader at Ukip’s first conference in Wales because of traffic on the M4.

Speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics Wales, Mr Farage said: "It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here – it should have taken three-and-a-half to four.

"That is nothing to do with professionalism, what it does have to do with is a population that is going through the roof chiefly because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be."

Boris Johnson: Nigel Farage’s decision to blame M4 traffic on immigration is like ‘effluent’ and ‘sewage’

"Yeah, I heard this. Xenophobia is like sewage, it’s a natural concomitant of the human condition," Mr Johnson said.

"We’ve got to manage it, we’ve got to dispose of it. It’s like effluent, it’s something that human beings naturally produce."

Pushed on the comments by the show's host Nick Ferrari, Mr Johnson said that immigration had been "massively" beneficial for London and the country but xenophobia reflected a wider fear of Otherness.

"It’s part of the way human beings are. I think there’s a natural sort of tendency to be alarmed about the Other, the alien," he said.

"My view about the whole immigration is very, very clear. London has benefited massively from immigration; the country benefits massively from immigration, but people need to be British.

"They need to speak English, they need to be loyal to this culture, to this country, to our institutions, to our society, to the Queen, to the rule of law – all the things that make us British – a sense of humour, and not freaking out about traffic jams on the motorway."

Mr Farage said over the weekend he was unable to attend a reception for 100 party supporters to meet the leader at Ukip’s first conference in Wales because of traffic on the M4.

Speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics Wales, Mr Farage said: "It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here – it should have taken three-and-a-half to four.

"That is nothing to do with professionalism, what it does have to do with is a population that is going through the roof chiefly because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be."

Boris Johnson: Nigel Farage’s decision to blame M4 traffic on immigration is like ‘effluent’ and ‘sewage’

"Yeah, I heard this. Xenophobia is like sewage, it’s a natural concomitant of the human condition," Mr Johnson said.

"We’ve got to manage it, we’ve got to dispose of it. It’s like effluent, it’s something that human beings naturally produce."

Pushed on the comments by the show's host Nick Ferrari, Mr Johnson said that immigration had been "massively" beneficial for London and the country but xenophobia reflected a wider fear of Otherness.

"It’s part of the way human beings are. I think there’s a natural sort of tendency to be alarmed about the Other, the alien," he said.

"My view about the whole immigration is very, very clear. London has benefited massively from immigration; the country benefits massively from immigration, but people need to be British.

"They need to speak English, they need to be loyal to this culture, to this country, to our institutions, to our society, to the Queen, to the rule of law – all the things that make us British – a sense of humour, and not freaking out about traffic jams on the motorway."

Mr Farage said over the weekend he was unable to attend a reception for 100 party supporters to meet the leader at Ukip’s first conference in Wales because of traffic on the M4.

Speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics Wales, Mr Farage said: "It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here – it should have taken three-and-a-half to four.

"That is nothing to do with professionalism, what it does have to do with is a population that is going through the roof chiefly because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be."

Boris Johnson: Nigel Farage’s decision to blame M4 traffic on immigration is like ‘effluent’ and ‘sewage’

"Yeah, I heard this. Xenophobia is like sewage, it’s a natural concomitant of the human condition," Mr Johnson said.

"We’ve got to manage it, we’ve got to dispose of it. It’s like effluent, it’s something that human beings naturally produce."

Pushed on the comments by the show's host Nick Ferrari, Mr Johnson said that immigration had been "massively" beneficial for London and the country but xenophobia reflected a wider fear of Otherness.

"It’s part of the way human beings are. I think there’s a natural sort of tendency to be alarmed about the Other, the alien," he said.

"My view about the whole immigration is very, very clear. London has benefited massively from immigration; the country benefits massively from immigration, but people need to be British.

"They need to speak English, they need to be loyal to this culture, to this country, to our institutions, to our society, to the Queen, to the rule of law – all the things that make us British – a sense of humour, and not freaking out about traffic jams on the motorway."

Mr Farage said over the weekend he was unable to attend a reception for 100 party supporters to meet the leader at Ukip’s first conference in Wales because of traffic on the M4.

Speaking to the BBC's Sunday Politics Wales, Mr Farage said: "It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here – it should have taken three-and-a-half to four.

"That is nothing to do with professionalism, what it does have to do with is a population that is going through the roof chiefly because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be."